The Backs of Men by Dominic Bracco II The Backs of Men is a portrait of the modern American frontier. Set in the borderlands of Texas, Mexico, and the killing fields of Honduras, this project attempts to break down the physical and societal borders we place around ourselves. The narrative follows the reciprocal patterns of violence and poverty and tells the stories of those it displaces.  Rather than follow the traditional migrant path, Bracco attempts to answer fundamental questions about why people leave their homes and what happens to those they leave behind. The result is an honest look at the connectivity of the Americas. The project brings together documentary photography, video, audio, installation, journalistic essays, dramatic fiction, graphic novel, classroom interaction and material aggregated from social media – to be used in the production of the multimedia exhibition/installation, public projection and the web documentary.

The Backs of Men by Dominic Bracco II

The Backs of Men is a portrait of the modern American frontier. Set in the borderlands of Texas, Mexico, and the killing fields of Honduras, this project attempts to break down the physical and societal borders we place around ourselves. The narrative follows the reciprocal patterns of violence and poverty and tells the stories of those it displaces. 

Rather than follow the traditional migrant path, Bracco attempts to answer fundamental questions about why people leave their homes and what happens to those they leave behind. The result is an honest look at the connectivity of the Americas.

The project brings together documentary photography, video, audio, installation, journalistic essays, dramatic fiction, graphic novel, classroom interaction and material aggregated from social media – to be used in the production of the multimedia exhibition/installation, public projection and the web documentary.

A short film and a video installation by Michael Christopher Brown. Produced by Screen

Uncomfortable is a three-chapter transmedia project on eating disorders. The chapters include ‘A Bad Day’, a multimedia interview with Jo, a 21 year old suffering from bulimia, ‘Thinspirations’, a documentation of the Pro-Ana community members promoting anorexia as a lifestyle, appropriating thousands of vernacular self-portraits shared online and The Epilogue, that documents the story of the Robinsons and their daughter Cammy, who died at the age of 26 from bulimia.